Using Django with MySQL 8

A framework can be a great way to allow you to spend more time on the actual application or web site and less time on standard tasks. It can also greatly reduce the amount of custom code needed. Django is one of the best known web frameworks for Python, and the good news is that it works out of the box with MySQL Server 8 and MySQL Connector/Python 8. This blog will look at how to use Django with MySQL 8.

There actually is very little to get Django to work with MySQL 8. Just install it, configure Django to use MySQL Connector/Python as a backend, and that’s it. From the Django point of view, you just have to configure the database option in settings.py to use MySQL Connector/Python and your database settings, for example:

DATABASES = {
    'default': {
        'NAME': 'mydb',
        'ENGINE': 'mysql.connector.django',
        'USER': 'django',
        'PASSWORD': '$@jkHhj34N!bd',
        'OPTIONS': {
          'autocommit': True,
        },
    }
}

Advice

The instructions in this blog should also work for older versions of MySQL.

Obviously this assumes, you have MySQL installed already. If you do not, the rest of the blog includes a more comprehensive list of steps. The first step is to install MySQL Server.

Django Administration Screen using MySQL as the backend
Django Administration Screen using MySQL as the backend

Installing MySQL Server

There are several ways to install MySQL Server and which one is the best depends on your circumstances and preferences. For the sake of this blog, I will show how MySQL Server can be installed on Oracle Linux/RHEL/CentOS 7 using RPMs and on Microsoft Windows using MySQL Installer. For more options, see the installation chapter in the reference manual. Let’s look at the Linux installation first.

RPM Install on Enterprise Linux

MySQL provides repositories for several Linux distributions including the Oracle Linux/RHEL/CentOS family. This makes it easy to install MySQL. The step to install the repository definition is:

shell$ sudo yum install https://dev.mysql.com/get/mysql80-community-release-el7-1.noarch.rpmLoaded plugins: langpacks, ulninfo
Repository ol7_developer_EPEL is listed more than once in the configuration
mysql80-community-release-el7-1.noarch.rpm                                     |  25 kB  00:00:00     
Examining /var/tmp/yum-root-Ts4OzC/mysql80-community-release-el7-1.noarch.rpm: mysql80-community-release-el7-1.noarch
Marking /var/tmp/yum-root-Ts4OzC/mysql80-community-release-el7-1.noarch.rpm to be installed
Resolving Dependencies
--> Running transaction check
---> Package mysql80-community-release.noarch 0:el7-1 will be installed
--> Finished Dependency Resolution

Dependencies Resolved

======================================================================================================
 Package                       Arch       Version   Repository                                   Size
======================================================================================================
Installing:
 mysql80-community-release     noarch     el7-1     /mysql80-community-release-el7-1.noarch      31 k

Transaction Summary
======================================================================================================
Install  1 Package

Total size: 31 k
Installed size: 31 k
Is this ok [y/d/N]: y
Downloading packages:
Running transaction check
Running transaction test
Transaction test succeeded
Running transaction
  Installing : mysql80-community-release-el7-1.noarch                                             1/1 
  Verifying  : mysql80-community-release-el7-1.noarch                                             1/1 

Installed:
  mysql80-community-release.noarch 0:el7-1

Complete!

Now, you can install MySQL Server. There are several RPMs to choose from and which you need depends on which other features you need to use. A common set of RPMs can be installed as:

shell$ sudo yum install mysql-community-server mysql-community-libs \
            mysql-community-libs-compat mysql-community-common mysql-community-client
...

Note

If you have another MySQL installation, it will be upgraded to the latest release (at the time of writing 8.0.13).

On the first start, the data directory will be initialized:

shell$ sudo systemctl start mysqld

To keep a fresh installation secure, a random password has been set for the root user. This can be found from the MySQL error log:

shell$ sudo grep password /var/log/mysqld.log 
2018-11-05T08:05:09.985857Z 5 [Note] [MY-010454] [Server] A temporary password is generated for root@localhost: KWNfuA!1r:PF

Use this password to connect to MySQL and update the password (please use a strong password):

shell$ mysql --user=root --password
Enter password:

Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 19
Server version: 8.0.13 MySQL Community Server - GPL

Copyright (c) 2000, 2018, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its
affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
owners.

Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.

mysql> ALTER USER root@localhost IDENTIFIED BY 'Kij0@jDi~Faf4';
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.13 sec)

MySQL is now ready for use. Before continuing, I will show an example of installing MySQL on Microsoft Windows.

Microsoft Windows

On Microsoft Windows an easy way to install MySQL is to use the MySQL Installer. The installer can be downloaded from the MySQL download site. The MySQL Installer can be used to install most MySQL products. If you start MySQL Installer for the first time, you will be taken directly to the screen to choose the products to install; if you already have installed products, you will need to choose to add new products.

On the Select Products and Features screen, choose to install MySQL Server 8.0 (MySQL Installer will list the latest release from the list of available products):

Installing MySQL Server 8.0.13 from MySQL Installer
Installing MySQL Server 8.0.13 from MySQL Installer

Optionally, you can filter the list of products. Feel free to choose other products you want. MySQL Notifier can be useful for starting and stopping MySQL, if you do not plan to have MySQL running at all times. You can also install MySQL Connector/Python this way, however for this blog a different method will be used.

Follow the installation wizard. For this blog, the default choices will work, though during the configuration you may want to ensure Open Windows Firewall ports for network access is unchecked unless you need remote access.

Before you can connect to MySQL from your Django program, you need a user and a schema (database) to use from your web site.

Preparing MySQL Server

While MySQL is now ready to work with Django, you will likely want to do a few more preparation steps. Here creating the MySQL user and schema (database) used by Django and support for named time zones will be covered.

Creating the User and Schema

An example of creating the user django@localhost and give it all privileges to the mydb schema and to create the mydb schema is:

mysql> CREATE USER django@localhost IDENTIFIED BY '$@jkHhj34N!bd';
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.11 sec)

mysql> GRANT ALL ON mydb.* TO django@localhost;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.11 sec)

mysql> CREATE DATABASE mydb CHARACTER SET utf8mb4;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.07 sec)

This will allow the django user to connect from the same host as MySQL Server is installed by authenticating with the password $@jkHhj34N!bd.

In MySQL 8 it is not necessary to specify the database character set to utf8mb4 as it is the default. However, if you use an older version of MySQL Server, you should ensure you are using UTF-8. The utf8mb4 character set means that characters using up to four bytes are supported.

Named Time Zones

If you want to used named time zones (for example Australia/Sydney), you will need to install the data for these in MySQL. On Linux you can use the mysql_tzinfo_to_sql script that comes with the MySQL installation:

shell$ mysql_tzinfo_to_sql /usr/share/zoneinfo | mysql --user=root --password mysql

On Microsoft Windows, you need to download the time zone information and load these into the database, for example:

mysql> use mysql
Database changed

mysql> SOURCE timezone_posix.sql

See also MySQL Server Time Zone Support in the reference manual.

Now, you can move on to MySQL Connector/Python and Django.

Installing MySQL Connector/Python and Django

Both MySQL Connector/Python and Django can be installed in a platform independent way using the pip command. Since Django 2.1 is only available for Python 3.4 and later, it is recommended to use Python 3.4 or later. This blog assumes Python 3.6. (MySQL Connector/Python 8.0.13 and later also supports Python 3.7.)

If you do not have Python 3.6 installed on Oracle Linux/RHEL/CentOS 7, you can easily install it for example from for EPEL repository. Assuming you have configured the EPEL repository, the following steps install Python 3.6, enable pip, and update pip to the latest version:

shell$ yum install python36
shell$ python3.6 -m ensurepip
shell$ python3.6 -m pip install --upgrade pip

You can now use python3.6 to invoke Python 3.6. In the following, replace python with python3.6 if you have installed Python 3.6 in this way.

To install the latest MySQL Connector/Python release (currently 8.0.13):

PS:> python -m pip install mysql-connector-python
Collecting mysql-connector-python
  Downloading https://files.pythonhosted.org/packages/4a/91/ffdd28ae0f8e01b09df67a4e48cef17a1a5374cd0ce0f2fe27e1d635423e/mysql_connector_python-8.0.13-cp36-cp36m-wi
(3.2MB)
    100% |████████████████████████████████| 3.2MB 3.0MB/s
Requirement already satisfied: protobuf>=3.0.0 in c:\users\myuser\appdata\local\programs\python\python36\lib\site-packages (from mysql-connector-pytho
st1)
Requirement already satisfied: six>=1.9 in c:\users\myuser\appdata\local\programs\python\python36\lib\site-packages (from protobuf>=3.0.0->mysql-conne
 (1.11.0)
Requirement already satisfied: setuptools in c:\users\myuser\appdata\local\programs\python\python36\lib\site-packages (from protobuf>=3.0.0->mysql-con
n) (28.8.0)
Installing collected packages: mysql-connector-python
Successfully installed mysql-connector-python-8.0.13

Similar for installing Django:

PS:> python -m pip install Django
Collecting Django
  Downloading https://files.pythonhosted.org/packages/d1/e5/2676be45ea49cfd09a663f289376b3888accd57ff06c953297bfdee1fb08/Django-2.1.3-py3-none-any.whl (7.3MB)
    100% |████████████████████████████████| 7.3MB 1.8MB/s
Collecting pytz (from Django)
  Downloading https://files.pythonhosted.org/packages/f8/0e/2365ddc010afb3d79147f1dd544e5ee24bf4ece58ab99b16fbb465ce6dc0/pytz-2018.7-py2.py3-none-any.whl (506kB)
    100% |████████████████████████████████| 512kB 10.5MB/s
Installing collected packages: pytz, Django
Successfully installed Django-2.1.3 pytz-2018.7

That’s it. Now you are ready to use Django with MySQL Connector/Python 8 and MySQL Server 8.

Using Django

I will not go into details of how to use Django. If you are new to Django, you can consider going through the tutorial for Django 2.1 on the Django website. This sets up a web site using a database backend. The important thing with respect to MySQL is the configuration of the DATABASE property in settings.py (the first step in part 2):

DATABASES = {
    'default': {
        'NAME': 'mydb',
        'ENGINE': 'mysql.connector.django',
        'USER': 'django',
        'PASSWORD': '$@jkHhj34N!bd',
        'OPTIONS': {
          'autocommit': True,
        },
    }
}

The key here is the engine. You need to set it to mysql.connector.django to use MySQL Connector/Python. The rest of the options are schema name, credentials, and MySQL Connector/Python specific options.

The Django documentation also has more information about using MySQL as the database. A couple of updates of the statements in the document:

  • As of MySQL 8, InnoDB does correctly restore the auto-increment ID after a restart.
  • The default character set in MySQL 8 is UTF-8 (called utf8mb4 in MySQL).
  • There is also support for a C Extension in MySQL Connector/Python. In MySQL 8 this is the default for the platforms/Python version where the C Extension is installed.

Note

In the second part of the tutorial, I need to swap the python manage.py sqlmigrate polls 0001 command with the next manage.py migrate command. Otherwise the sqlmigrate commands fails with an error.

The rest is all Python and Django. Have fun creating your next web site with Django, MySQL Connector/Python 8, and MySQL 8.

If you are interested in learning more about MySQL Connector/Python 8, then I am the author of MySQL Connector/Python Revealed (Apress) – also available at Amazon and other bookshops.

2 thoughts on “Using Django with MySQL 8

  1. ychda 29 July, 2019 / 22:21

    django.core.exceptions.ImproperlyConfigured: ‘mysql.connector.django’ isn’t an available database backend.
    Try using ‘django.db.backends.XXX’, where XXX is one of:
    ‘mysql’, ‘oracle’, ‘postgresql’, ‘sqlite3’

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.